Pacific Brook Christian School officially launched in Muswellbrook

TRANS-denominational is a big word but one that aptly describes the newly-renamed Pacific Brook Christian School in Muswellbrook.

The Pacific Group of Schools has ensured the future of the small school, previously known as Muswellbrook Christian School, by taking it under its wing.

CUT RIBBON: Pacific Brook school captains Mitchell Hartup and Lachlan Smith with Max Maddock, Dr Tina Lamont, Dr Ted Boyce and their principal David O’Hara.

CUT RIBBON: Pacific Brook school captains Mitchell Hartup and Lachlan Smith with Max Maddock, Dr Tina Lamont, Dr Ted Boyce and their principal David O’Hara.

“We are trans-denominational which means we include all bible-believing Christians across all denominations,” Dr Ted Boyce said at the launch on Wednesday.

Dr Boyce is the executive principal of the group and principal of Pacific Hills Christian School.

“Most schools are not communities but institutions,” Dr Boyce said as he addressed the small crowd and students gathered at the launch.

“Communities are governed by relationships. God gives children to parents, not to schools, and a school is not a school without the community.”

Pacific Brook Christian School board chairman Max Maddock helped the school’s captains, Mitchell Hartup and Lachlan Smith, cut the ribbon at the gates to symbolise the new beginning.

“I’m looking forward to seeing this school grow and be a great part of the community,” Mr Maddock said.

Last November Dr Boyce said he believed Pacific Brook would outgrow its current space and need to relocate, which could then possibly include a high school.

Lead principal Dr Tina Lamont also spoke and told the children they were “pioneers” of the school that one day would become a really big school.

“We’re already looking at land,” Dr Lamont said.  

Pacific Brook has 25 students and is led by principal David O’Hara.

It joins the Pacific Group of Schools which encompasses Pacific Hills, Pacific Coast and Pacific Valley Christian schools and three hope schools for autistic children.

The group has grown markedly since its inception 38 years ago when one teacher and eight children used a spare room of an orphanage for schooling.