Hunter Valley Police District's Guy Guiana nominated for prestigious NSW Rotary Policeman of the Year community service award

HONOURED: Hunter Valley Police District Chief Inspector Guy Guiana is humbled to be nominated for NSW Rotary's Policeman of the Year award for community service.
HONOURED: Hunter Valley Police District Chief Inspector Guy Guiana is humbled to be nominated for NSW Rotary's Policeman of the Year award for community service.

GREAT police officers can do many things, whether it be protecting us on the front line, catching criminals from behind closed doors or engaging with the community and representing the best the force has to offer.

In the case of Hunter Valley Police District’s Chief Inspector Guy Guiana, he’s done it all.

But, in 2018, he’s also been nominated for the NSW Rotary Policeman of the Year community service award.

Chief Inspector Guiana has spent an incredible 31 years on the force, spending time in Sydney’s CBD before arriving in the Upper Hunter more than a decade ago.

Forever modest and cracking a joke, he played down the reasons why he received the nomination, before hesitantly acknowledging all the hard work he’s done.

“My initial reaction was I think they just wanted a night out,” he said.

“But, I think it’s just a culmination of what I’ve been doing in the community since I’ve been here.”

His level of involvement is extraordinary, working with several councils on a range of issues, a long-time member of the Upper Hunter Community Services committee and an ambassador for White Ribbon.

On his ambassadorial role, he said it’s something he’s always had an interest in and thinks it’s crucial to spread awareness.

“I think domestic violence is an issue that affects everyone throughout the shire,” Chief Inspector Guiana admitted.

“I just like to be involved in the community.”

GOOD GUY: Chief Inspector Guy Guiana has given his time and service to the force for more than three decades.

GOOD GUY: Chief Inspector Guy Guiana has given his time and service to the force for more than three decades.

He finds it hard to identify what particular part of his service, both as a policeman and community member, he would class as his crowning achievement, but believes his work as an officer makes the most difference.

“I think keeping things on a steady keel is important, when you look at crime, especially in the Upper Hunter, has been relatively steady,” he said. 

“And, I’ve always fought hard to try and keep the momentum up from the policing side of things and I think to a certain extent that shows.”

In terms of his reaction to the nomination, he said it was both surprising and pleasing, although he never thought about doing the job for individual honours.

“I felt quite privileged really,” he said.

“It’s not something I was expecting and certainly not something I knew anything about.

“At the end of the day I don’t think I do anything over and above what other police do but it’s certainly nice to be recognised for my efforts.”

While he may be as humble as they come, it’s obvious to anyone that has the pleasure of meeting Chief Inspector Guiana that he’s one of a kind and truly deserving of such high praise.