Bengalla enter partnership with McGrath Foundation in support of employees

PINK POSITIVE: Kristy Newton is happy her workplace at Bengalla is supporting the McGrath Foundation, which is a group close to her heart.
PINK POSITIVE: Kristy Newton is happy her workplace at Bengalla is supporting the McGrath Foundation, which is a group close to her heart.

MANY Australians have someone they know who has been affected by breast cancer and, if you're lucky, that person would have spent time with a McGrath Foundation nurse.

Allocated to regional and rural areas, the medical professionals provide free physical, psychological and emotional support to those going through treatment.

The charity, which was set up by former Australian cricket legend Glenn McGrath in honour of his wife Jane, currently has 135 nurses spread across the country.

Donations are crucial to the organisation, and therefore they surely be thankful for a recent $10,000 cheque from Bengalla.

The company has pledged to enter a partnership with the foundation, and has even added a new addition to their work site - a 100 tonne bright pink Caterpillar D11T bulldozer.

An unmistakable sight, the piece of machinery originally belonged to the West Moreton mine in Queensland, but that operation has since shut down and the Muswellbrook site decided the asset was too new and valuable to not adopt.

The colour pink has been synonymous with the charity since its inception, and Bengalla officials are hoping it will make people think about the cause around the workplace.

One employee it will mean a lot to is Kristy Newton, who works as an operator, and has recently beaten breast cancer with the help of the McGrath Foundation.

Her story began when she was 35, and just felt an itch on the side of her breast, but after being convinced to go to the doctor by her friend - that happened to be a radiographer - her life changed.

After a biopsy she was diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer, and underwent 15 rounds of chemotherapy, a double mastectomy and reconstruction.

But, in her own words, she has "come out the other end".

She was thrilled to see the unveiling of the bulldozer, and took time to discuss how important having a nurse was throughout her treatment.

"They're someone that held my hand all they way through it, be it talking about the anxiety of the disease, changing bandages, wounds or helping with chemotherapy side affects," Ms Newton said.

The fact her work is now supporting an organisation so special to her is something the 38-year-old couldn't be happier about.

"In this industry there's more and more numbers of women, so the more education that's out there [the better]," she stated.

"Be it a pink ribbon day in October or a pink dozer, it's all awareness."

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