Hunter Valley LAC to honour fallen at 2017 Police Remembrance Day in Muswellbrook

A TIME TO REFLECT: Hunter Valley LAC Detective Chief Inspector Timothy Seymour. Behind him, a plaque outside Muswellbrook Police Station honouring those who have fallen.
A TIME TO REFLECT: Hunter Valley LAC Detective Chief Inspector Timothy Seymour. Behind him, a plaque outside Muswellbrook Police Station honouring those who have fallen.

EVERY day, NSW Police officers across the state leave for work not knowing what they will encounter in their day.

Often they face difficult jobs in dangerous circumstances.

On Friday, as part of Police Remembrance Day, the Hunter Vallery Local Area Command will pay tribute to NSW Police members who have lost their lives in the line of duty.

There will be a nondenominational service at St Alban’s Church, from 10am, followed by a morning tea at Muswellbrook RSL Club.

Hunter Valley LAC Detective Chief Inspector Timothy Seymour said all were invited to attend.

“You don’t have to have a connection with the cops,” he said.

“[It’s fine] if you just want to come along and pay your respects to officers who have fallen over the years.

“It’s only a short service; it’s not big on ceremony.”

Detective Chief Inspector Seymour said it was an important event because police go out every day, in the face of danger, which is often unseen by the general public.

“Sadly, sometimes that results in police officers getting killed in the line of duty,” he said.

“Some police officers get injured, psychologically and physically, but some officers do die.

“There’s dangers in it that maybe people don’t realise, because the most interaction they might have with the police is police doing point duty or doing RBT.

“[The service] will be very similar to what we did last year.

“Our police Chaplin – Reverend Nate Atkinson, who’s a teacher and Chaplin up at Scone Grammar –  he’s going to conduct the service for us.

“We light candles for the fallen officers.”

Detective Chief Inspector Seymour said it showed the police weren’t only there to enforce the laws.

“We are humans – we are just a cross section of the community, and we have families, we have loved ones at home,” he said.

“So, it’s good to see a human side of the police.

“Anyone who’d like to come along, please do.”