Curating inner splendidness at the museum of self love

LOVE RISING: The roaming pop-up Museum of Self-Love is part of The Body Shop's global self-love uprising. Picture: Shuttertsock.

LOVE RISING: The roaming pop-up Museum of Self-Love is part of The Body Shop's global self-love uprising. Picture: Shuttertsock.

Hey, you. The one with the post-Easter holiday blues. I've got something to cheer you up: the Museum of Self-Love!

Isn't that in Amsterdam? I visited once. Very risqué. Things there you can never un-see.

That's the sex museum.

Not the same thing?

Nope. Although this museum will display 'self-love objects' from high-profile people, so some confusion is inevitable.

I can imagine Gwyneth Paltrow bubble-wrapping her jade egg as we speak. So what's it really all about?

The roaming pop-up museum is part of The Body Shop's global Self-Love Uprising, aimed at helping us all appreciate our own inner splendidness. It'll feature objects and stories donated by 12 inspiring Australians. And you'll be able to submit your own objects to the museum's online version.

A promising concept indeed, but its success depends entirely on the 'inspiring people' involved. I'm not buying a ticket to gaze at some politician's old debating trophy, or a ball kicked by a dodgy footy player, or in fact any random artifacts of celebrity narcissism.

You're in luck, then. The Australians in the museum are bona fide awesome. They include the indigenous healer Allira Potter, LGBTQIA activist Deni Todorovic, feminist podcaster Abbie Chatfield and talented Wentworth actor Zoe Terakes.

Nearly one in two people around the world feel more self-doubt than self-love.

Great people. So why here and now?

Earlier in the year, The Body Shop published their Self-Love Index, compiled from a global study of 22,000 people from 21 different countries. The average score was a measly 53 on a scale of zero to 100, which means that nearly one in two people around the world feel more self-doubt than self-love.

How did Australia score?

Not bad, actually. We're the second best self-love performer, sandwiched between Denmark and the US. But our national average self-love is only 62.

Does The Body Shop recommend addressing this problem with mango body butter?

No, you old cynic. The Body Shop's activism game is strong. This campaign has smart, diverse and compassionate spokespeople and a heap of online tools for self-care beyond potions. We need to get behind this.

OK. When and where?

The museum is in Sydney from April 15-18. But you can also get involved online. For details visit the Body Shop's Museum of Self Love here.

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