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Tinder launches safety campaign amid sexual assaults linked to online dating applications

Tinder has launched a safety campaign amid concerns that "sexual assaults linked to online apps are becoming more frequent".

Queensland Police and Tinder launched the joint campaign on Friday, which will see messages appear while users are swiping for potential matches within the Tinder app in the Sunshine State for the next eight weeks.

"Report sexual assault for yourselves and others," one of the messages read.

"We're all here for different things. Hook up. Doggos. Friendship. Relationship. Nothing is set in stone," another read.

Queensland Police Commissioner Katarina Carroll said "this campaign is about empowering people to use these platforms safely".

"We see from our data that sexual assaults linked to online apps are becoming more frequent. We've seen a steady increase in the past 10 years, mirroring the evolving way we use technology," Commissioner Carroll said.

"We want people to know that we are here, we want them to be safe and if something unwanted happens, they are not alone. Support and reporting options are available.

"We're also sending a message to potential offenders. We will not tolerate violations of people's safety or criminal behaviour."

Queensland Police and Tinder launched the joint campaign on Friday, which will see messages appear while users are swiping for potential matches within the Tinder app in the Sunshine State for the next eight weeks.

Queensland Police and Tinder launched the joint campaign on Friday, which will see messages appear while users are swiping for potential matches within the Tinder app in the Sunshine State for the next eight weeks.

The dating giant has also released a safety guide for those using Tinder across the country.

Tinder advises people look out for verified profiles with a blue tick to make sure people are who they say they are in their pictures.

It also advises users make the most of their video chat feature, which can allow users to see if they have chemistry before meeting for a physical date.

If Tinder detects a potentially offensive message, it will ask "does this bother you?". If the message is offensive, users can report it.

Likewise, if someone is about to send a potentially offensive message, the app will ask "are you sure?" to make them think twice.

Queensland Police Commissioner Katarina Carroll said "we see from our data that sexual assaults linked to online apps are becoming more frequent".

Queensland Police Commissioner Katarina Carroll said "we see from our data that sexual assaults linked to online apps are becoming more frequent".

Users can unmatch or block people they match with as well as preemptively block people so they won't show up or see their profile by entering their contact details.

Lastly, the app encourages users to report inappropriate behaviour through its "robust reporting framework to swiftly evaluate member behaviour to ensure it adheres to the Community Guidelines".

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"Members can report someone directly from a profile, reach out through the Safety Centre or contact the Tinder team online at any time. From there, team takes appropriate action to help keep the community safer and more respectful," the guidelines read.

Despite the number of precautions in place, an ABC investigation last year found that out of 231 Tinder users, 48 reported sexual offence to the app - but just 11 received responses from the app.

Tinder is owned by parent company Match Group, which owns 13 other dating apps such as Hinge, OkCupid and Match.com.

The company's Senior Director of Law Enforcement Ops Buddy Loomis said the campaign with Queensland Police is about sending a strong message.

"Today we're taking an even stronger stand that harassment, offensive and violating behaviour have no place on Tinder," Ms Loomis said.

"Our members' safety is of utmost importance and we're excited to be partnering with Queensland Police to spread that important message, and empower the Tinder community to be safe, feel supported, and take action against users who are unwilling to act responsibly."

In April, NSW Police proposed using artificial intelligence to scan conversations between Tinder users for "red flags" and also proposed a "portal" for police to access reports of sexual assaults made to dating apps.

At the time, Match Group released a statement saying they were in conversation s NSW Police but had not agreed to their safety proposals.

"We recognise we have an important role to play in helping prevent sexual assault and harassment in communities around the world,' the statement read.

"We are committed to ongoing discussions and collaboration with global partners in law enforcement and with leading sexual assault organisations like RAINN to help make our platforms and communities safer.

"While members of our safety team are in conversations with police departments and advocacy groups to identify potential collaborative efforts, Match Group and our brands have not agreed to implement the NSW Police proposal."

In April, NSW Police proposed using artificial intelligence to scan conversations between Tinder users for "red flags" and also proposed a "portal" for police to access reports of sexual assaults made to dating apps.

In April, NSW Police proposed using artificial intelligence to scan conversations between Tinder users for "red flags" and also proposed a "portal" for police to access reports of sexual assaults made to dating apps.